Using seasonal produce makes sense both from a financial and taste point of view.

Seasonal fruit and vegetables are more plentiful, cheaper and fresher – and help to cut down on the air miles needed to bring in out-of-season food from far flung climates. This also adds to low carbon footprint and corporate responsibility credentials.

Adapting them into your menu makes sense and could be an added draw for foodies looking to taste something a bit different.

With the rise in interest in vegetarian and vegan diets the chance to try out the fruit and veg of the season will hopefully also reach a wider audience.

Catering to the seasons makes sense

From a storage point of view, seasonal cooking also brings storage benefits. Seasonal fruit and vegetables are, as a general rule, more hardy making them easier to store.

As a result of their shorter journey time from field to kitchen, seasonal fruit and vegetables should also stay fresher for longer.

Planning ahead for the upcoming crop and having a menu already worked out will let your kitchen make the most of seasonal food.

Here’s a reminder of the best of the seasonal crop to help you plan ahead:

Spring Seasonal Fruits and Vegetables

The stars of the season with their unique flavours are undoubtedly asparagus, purple sprouting broccoli and rhubarb. Spinach, spring greens and spring onions are abundant too.

Summer Seasonal Fruits and Vegetables

The warmer months make salad a popular choice with cucumber, tomatoes and lettuce being at their best. Broad beans, fennel and beetroot add extra interest, taste and colour. Seasonal berries deliver an excellent summer sweetener and are extremely refreshing.

Autumn Seasonal Fruits and Vegetables

Nothing says autumn dining like deliciously versatile squash – in whatever variety you choose. Apples, blackberries and plums all compliment the traditional spectre of classy comfort food.

Winter Seasonal Fruits and Vegetables

Yet more comfort food as the cold really takes hold with root veg being the favoured food of the season. Brussels sprouts, red cabbage, parsnips, turnips and Swedes all fare well at this time of year and make for inventive, wholesome cooking.

As sustainability informs consumer choice choosing a seasonal menu can help to support that movement – and tempt in new diners looking for a tasty treat.

With longer shelf-life, cheaper transport and tastier food serving up the seasons makes sense.

Is your kitchen in need of an update?

To find out more about designing a new kitchen or replacing equipment contact the Caterline team online or pick up the phone to call 01384 459 111.